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Houston, texas
USA

Little Red Leaves Textile Series is a tiny press with a mission to publish innovative writing in delightful little packages. 

Future Occupations by Lee Gough

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Future Occupations by Lee Gough

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Future Occupations by Lee Gough

8.00

 "Future Occupations" is a longer poem, not really a series, just one long thing.  I started it when my daughter was toddler and she's 6 now, so I've been writing it in spurts for a while, sometimes as a way of parsing visual work.  I was thinking about the contingencies of mine & my daughter's future and this world of so many occupations ( and now with the precarious "Occupy movement" even more) of so many kinds and in so many senses -- mental, physical spaces -- among other things, the architecture, if you will, of occupation, the evocations of the word and idea. I think in the title I was also thinking about my own material life, my occupation as a mother, artist and poet, and like many cultural workers, "unemployed." I went to Temple's program in Poetry in the mid 90's (back when it was an MA program in Creative Writing) but since then I have not allied myself with academic occupations which sustain so many poets.

Finally, the particular part of Future Occupations that I sent to LRL begins to approach a way of reflecting on wars abroad, with the counter-fact of prisons at home.  Coincidentally, my father actually worked in prisons most of his life, and committed suicide shortly after he was laid off his job at a women's prison outside Philadelphia, due to cuts in mental health service (he was a forensic psychologist). 

And so the poem has to do with wondering how to affirm future life and lives in the context of social (and personal) trauma, how to be like a vulture -- to eat death but not become it.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Lee Gough lives in Brooklyn, NY. She occasionally teaches art in New York City public schools. More of her recent poetry can be found in Antennae 12, and more of her drawing, print media and (coming soon) experimental animation work is at leegough.net